Premium fresh herbs from Israel wholesale supply basil, chard, chervil, chives, coriander, parsley, dill, lemongrass, lovage, marjoram, mint, mizuna, oregano, parsley, peppermint, red basil, red chard, rosemary, rucola, arugula, rocket salad, sage, salicornia, savory, sorrel, spinach, tarragon, thyme

List of fresh herbs

Flora Export S.G. Israel LTD provides full range of premium fresh cut culinary herbs during all seasons.
Our wide assortment includes the following fresh herbs: basil, bulls blood, chard, chervil, chives, coriander, curly parsley, dill, lemongrass, lettuce, lovage, marjoram, mint, mizuna, oregano, parsley, peppermint, red basil, red chard, rosemary, rucola (arugula, rocket salad), sage, salicornia savory, sorrel, spinach, tarragon, thyme and more. Lettuces and salads: baby spring mix salad (baby mix salad), iceberg salad, lollo rosso lettuce, pak choi, romaine lettuce. We also supply micro greens (micro leaves) and gourmet edible flowers.
Below you can find Wikipedia™ articles with interesting facts about fresh herbs*.


BASIL (sweet basil)



Basil is commonly used fresh in cooked recipes. In general, it is added at the last moment, as cooking quickly destroys the flavor. The fresh herb can be kept for a short time in plastic bags in the refrigerator, or for a longer period in the freezer, after being blanched quickly in boiling water. The dried herb also loses most of its flavor, and what little flavor remains tastes very different, with a weak coumarin flavor, like hay. Basil is one of the main ingredients in pesto - a green Italian oil-and-herb sauce. Its other main ingredients are olive oil, garlic, and pine nuts. The Chinese also use fresh or dried basils in soups and other foods. > more

CHARD



Chard has a slightly bitter taste and is used in a variety of cultures around the world, including Arab cuisine. Fresh young chard can be used raw in salads. Mature chard leaves and stalks are typically cooked (like in pizzoccheri) or sauteed; their bitterness fades with cooking, leaving a refined flavor which is more delicate than that of cooked spinach. > more

CHERVIL



Often referred to as the "gourmet’s parsley", chervil tastes mildly of licorice combined with pepper imparting certain freshness to a dish. Fresh or dried, it is a bright green and quite delicate and should be added to a dish at the end of cooking. Chervil has a tendency to enhance the flavors of other herbs when used in combinations. The most notable case is fines herbes, the French blend of at least three herbs, ground fine, where one herb is almost always chervil. A member of the parsley family, chervil is more delicate and fernlike than the familiar parsley. It is similar in appearance to parsley, available in curly to plain varieties. > more

CHIVES



Chives are grown for their leaves, which are used for culinary purposes as a flavoring herb, and provide a somewhat milder flavour than those of other Allium species. Chives have a wide variety of culinary uses, such as in traditional dishes in France and Sweden, among others. They are also an ingredient of the gräddfil sauce served with the traditional herring dish served at Swedish midsummer celebrations. The flowers may also be used to garnish dishes. In Poland, chives are served with quark cheese. Chives are one of the "fines herbes" of French cuisine, which also include tarragon, chervil and/or parsley. > more

CORIANDER



The leaves are variously referred to as coriander leaves, fresh coriander, Chinese parsley, or cilantro (particularly in North America). Fresh coriander leaves, also known as Chinese parsley or cilantro. The fresh leaves are an ingredient in many South Asian foods (such as chutneys and salads), in Chinese dishes, in Mexican cooking, particularly in salsa and guacamole and as a garnish, and in salads in Russia and other CIS countries. Chopped coriander leaves are a garnish on Indian dishes such as dal. As heat diminishes their flavor, coriander leaves are often used raw or added to the dish immediately before serving. > more

DILL



Fresh and dried dill leaves are used as herbs, mainly in Germany, Poland, Finland, Norway, Sweden, the Baltic, in Russia, and in central Asia. Like caraway, its fernlike leaves are aromatic and are used to flavor many foods, such as gravlax (cured salmon), borscht and other soups, and pickles (where the dill flower is sometimes used). Dill is best when used fresh, as it loses its flavor rapidly if dried; however, freeze-dried dill leaves preserve their flavor relatively well for a few months. Dill seed is used as a spice, with a flavor somewhat similar to caraway, but also resembling that of fresh or dried dill weed. Dill is the herb most often added to fish. > more

LEMONGRASS



Lemongrass is native to India and tropical Asia. It is widely used as a herb in Asian cuisine. It has a subtle citrus flavor and can be dried and powdered, or used fresh. It is commonly used in teas, soups, and curries. It is also suitable for use with poultry, fish, beef, and seafood. It is often used as a tea in African countries such as Togo and the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Latin American countries such as Mexico. > more

LETTUCE



The majority of lettuce is grown for its leaves, although one type is grown for its stem and one for its seeds, which are made into an oil. Most lettuce is used in salads, either alone or with other foliage, vegetables, meats and cheeses. Romaine lettuce is often used for Caesar salads, with a dressing that includes anchovies and eggs. Lettuce leaves can also be found in soups, sandwiches and wraps, while the stems are eaten both raw and cooked. The consumption of lettuce in China developed differently than in Western countries, due to health risks and cultural aversion to eating raw leaves. In that country, "salads" were created from cooked vegetables and served hot or cold. Lettuce was also used in a larger variety of dishes than in Western countries, contributing to a range of dishes including bean curd and meat dishes, soups and stir-frys plain or with other vegetables. > more

LOVAGE



It has been long cultivated in Europe, the leaves being used as a herb, the roots as a vegetable, and the seeds as a spice, especially in southern European cuisine. The leaves can be used in salads, or to make soup, and the roots can be eaten as a vegetable or grated for use in salads. Its flavor and smell is very similar to celery. Lovage tea can be applied to wounds as an antiseptic, or drunk to stimulate digestion. The seeds can be used as a spice, similar to fennel seeds. In the UK, an alcoholic lovage cordial is traditionally mixed with brandy in the ratio of 2:1 as a winter drink. > more

MARJORAM



Marjoram is cultivated for its aromatic leaves, either green or dry, for culinary purposes; the tops are cut as the plants begin to flower and are dried slowly in the shade. It is often used in herb combinations such as herbes de Provence and za'atar. The flowering leaves and tops of marjoram are steam-distilled to produce an essential oil that is yellowish in color (darkening to brown as it ages). Leaves - raw or cooked. Sweet marjoram is widely used as a flavoring for salad dressings, vegetables, legumes and oils. It has a more delicate flavor than the closely related oregano, and is best when used fresh and only added towards the end of cooking. > more

MINT (MENTHA)



The leaf, fresh or dried, is the culinary source of mint. Fresh mint is usually preferred over dried mint when storage of the mint is not a problem. The leaves have a warm, fresh, aromatic, sweet flavor with a cool aftertaste. Mint leaves are used in teas, beverages, jellies, syrups, candies, and ice creams. In Middle Eastern cuisine, mint is used on lamb dishes, while in British cuisine and American cuisine, mint sauce and mint jelly are used. Mint essential oil and menthol are extensively used as flavorings in breath fresheners, drinks, antiseptic mouth rinses, toothpaste, chewing gum, desserts, candies and mint chocolate. > more

MIZUNA



A thin whispy salad green, related to Chinese cabbage, with a mild mustard flavor. Native to Japan, this vegetable averages 14" to 16" in height with leaves that are green and yellow, smooth in texture and somewhat feathery in shape. It is available as a mature green or as a baby version that is smaller in size and more tender in texture. As a salad green mizuna can be steamed, boiled, stir-fried or used to complement other foliage mixed together for a salad, especially Red Asian Mustard foliage. > more

OREGANO



Oregano is an important culinary herb, used for the flavor of its leaves, which can be more flavorful when dried than fresh. It has an aromatic, warm and slightly bitter taste, which can vary in intensity. Good quality oregano may be strong enough almost to numb the tongue, but the cultivars adapted to colder climates often have a lesser flavor. Factors such as climate, seasons and soil composition may affect the aromatic oils present, and this effect may be greater than the differences between the various species of plants. Oregano's most prominent modern use is as the staple herb of Italian-American cuisine. There, it is most frequently used with roasted, fried or grilled vegetables, meat and fish. > more

PARSLEY



Parsley is widely used in Middle Eastern, European and American cooking. Curly leaf parsley is often used as a garnish. In central and eastern Europe and in western Asia, many dishes are served with fresh green chopped parsley sprinkled on top. Green parsley is often used as a garnish on potato dishes (boiled or mashed potatoes), on rice dishes (risotto or pilaf), on fish, fried chicken, lamb or goose, steaks, meat or vegetable stews (like beef bourguignon, goulash or chicken paprikash). In southern & central Europe parsley is part of bouquet garni, a bundle of fresh herbs used as an ingredient in stocks, soups, sauces. > more

ROSEMARY



The leaves, both fresh and dried, are used in traditional Mediterranean cuisine. They have a bitter, astringent taste and are highly aromatic, which complements a wide variety of foods. A tisane can be made from the leaves. When burnt, they give off a mustard-like smell and a smell similar to burning wood, which can be used to flavor foods while barbecuing. Rosemary is high in iron, calcium and vitamin B6. Rosemary extract has been shown to improve the shelf life and heat stability of omega 3-rich oils, which are prone to rancidity. > more

RUCOLA (arugula, rocket salad, garden rocket)



Salad rocket has a rich, peppery taste and an exceptionally pungent flavor for a leafy green. It is frequently used in salads, often mixed with other foliage in a mesclun. It is also used raw with pasta or meats in northern Italy and in western Slovenia. In Italy, raw rocket is often added to pizzas just before the baking period ends or immediately afterwards, so that it will not wilt in the heat. It is also used cooked in Puglia, in Southern Italy, to make the pasta dish cavatiéddi, in which large amounts of coarsely chopped rocket are added to pasta seasoned with a homemade reduced tomato sauce and pecorino, as well as in many unpretentious recipes in which it is added, chopped, to sauces and cooked dishes or in a sauce used a condiment for cold meats and fish. > more

SAGE



It is the plain narrow-leafed varieties and the non-flowering broad-leafed varieties of sage that are used as cooking herbs. It is a common condiment for Mediterranean dishes, specifically Italian foods. It is generally used in marinades for meat, fish, pork sausage, lamb and even vegetables like peas, eggplants, lima beans and carrots. It is the perfect seasoning for poultry. Interestingly enough, sage is used in the preparation of English Sage Derby cheese and other soft cheeses. It is also used as a flavoring in certain biscuits, scones, breads and other baked foods. Generally sage should be used sparingly as a culinary herb as it has a very strong flavor that tends to override everything else. When added in small quantities at the start of cooking, it pairs up nicely with other cooking herbs, like rosemary, thyme and oregano. > more

SALICORNIA



Salicornia europaea is highly edible, either cooked or raw. In England, it is one of several plants known as samphire; the term samphire is believed to be a corruption of the French name, herbe de Saint-Pierre, which means "St. Peter's herb". Samphire is usually cooked, either steamed or microwaved, and then coated in butter or olive oil. Due to its high salt content, it must be cooked without any salt added, in plenty of water. It has a hard, stringy core, and after cooking, the edible flesh is pulled off from the core. This flesh, after cooking, resembles seaweed in color, and the flavor and texture are like young spinach stems or asparagus. > more

SAVORY



Summer savory is a traditional popular herb in Atlantic Canada, where it is used in the same way sage is elsewhere. It is the main flavoring in dressing for many fowl, mixed with ground pork and other basic ingredients to create a thick meat dressing known as "cretonade", which is excellent with turkey, goose and duck. It also is used to make stews such as fricot, and in meat pies. It is usually available year-round in local grocery stores in dried form and is used in varying proportions, sometimes added to recipes in large generous heaping spoonfuls (such as in cretonade), and sometimes more subtly (as in beans, for which savory has a natural affinity). > more

SORREL



Sorrel is delicious used as an herb or as a salad green - its tartness is really refreshing. A traditional way to enjoy sorrel is cooked into a sauce and served with fish, lending a lemony flavor without the use of lemon. It's also great cooked into soups or stews. Baby sorrel foliage can be tossed into mixed salads. Its use in cooking long predates the French, with records of its use in ancient Egypt. A good source of vitamins A and C, some gastronomes claim French sorrel is an aid to digestion as well as a tasty, tart condiment in food. Other culinary uses for sorrel include pastries, stews, fried foods and meat pies. > more

SPINACH



Spinach is often eaten raw in salads, but rarely mixed with other foliage, and usually according to a fairly strict recipe of spinach salad which includes bacon and hard-boiled eggs. It is also eaten cooked as a side dish, either alone or creamed, and as an ingredient in many French and Italian dishes, to which it adds an earthy vegetal quality and a subtle sweetness. > more

TARRAGON (estragon)



Tarragon is one of the four fines herbes of French cooking, and is particularly suitable for chicken, fish and egg dishes. Tarragon is the main flavoring component of Béarnaise sauce. Fresh, lightly bruised sprigs of tarragon are steeped in vinegar to produce tarragon vinegar. Tarragon is used to flavor a popular carbonated soft drink in the countries of Azerbaijan, Armenia, Georgia and, by extension, Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan. The drink, named Tarhun, is made out of sugary tarragon concentrate and colored bright green. In Slovenia, tarragon is used as a spice for a traditional sweet cake called potica. In Hungary a popular kind of chicken soup is flavored with tarragon. > more

THYME



Thyme is sold both fresh and dried. The fresh form is more flavourful, but also less convenient; storage life is rarely more than a week. While summer-seasonal, fresh greenhouse thyme is often available year round. Fresh thyme is commonly sold in bunches of sprigs. Dried thyme is widely used in Armenia (called Urc) in teas. Depending on how it is used in a dish, the whole sprig may be used (e.g. in a bouquet garni), or the leaves removed and the stems discarded. Usually when a recipe specifies 'bunch' or 'sprig', it means the whole form; when it specifies spoons it means the leaves. It is perfectly acceptable to substitute dried for whole thyme. > more


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Herbs facts

 


A sweet, peppery digestive alcohol called rucolino is made from rocket on the island of Ischia in the Gulf of Naples. This liqueur is a local specialty enjoyed in small quantities following a meal in the same way as a limoncello or grappa. In Brazil, where its use is widespread, rocket is eaten raw in salads. A popular combination is rocket mixed with mozzarella cheese (normally made out of buffalo milk) and sun-dried tomatoes. Wikipedia